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Fritters, Soup, Gloves and Karen Millen
Glass ramekins and what to do with them

imageI have had a lovely play in the kitchen today and amongst other things, I made this curry. It is gorgeous!

I got an order from Approved Food this week which included some large tins of mango pulp. I wanted to make a main dish with it, rather than a sweet one, so I had a bit of a google and a think and decided to do this.

I had the last of a box of coconut milk powder also from Approved Food to use up, some chick peas I had previously cooked sitting in the freezer, some spinach in there and plenty of spices.

Two tins chickpeas, or 250g dried, soaked and cooked
Dried ones Asda 95p/500g, 47p
An onion, chopped, Asda 98p/2kg, 5p
200g mango pulp, Asda £1.50/850g, 35p
150g coconut milk powder Tesco £2.85/300g, £1.42
Or a tin of coconut milk, 95p
200g frozen spinach Asda £1.39/kg, 28p
Tbslp curry powder, Asda Madras 66p/100g, 3p
Total of £2.13 using coconut milk
Or 53p a portion – makes 4 portions

You could well get the ingredients cheaper than this.

I had tins of mango pulp from AP for 25p, so 6p
Coconut milk for 49p, so 24p
Dried chick peas from the Indian shop, about 25p
Total of 91p or 23p a portion

Just these 3 ingredients bought cheaper has halved the price per portion!

I used a general, mild, curry powder from Rajah that was fine.

If you are using mySupermarket to buy the tin of mango, (it’s what I use to price recipes) it doesn’t show up unless you search for ‘tinned tropical fruit’!

Sauté the onion in a little oil, add the spices and sizzle them to bring out the flavour. Spices are often oil soluble, not water soluble, so you get the best flavour by cooking them in oil.

Add everything else and simmer gently for a few minutes. And that’s it, job done.

We had it with a Nan, 4p each, or you could use value rice for 3p or 4p each, or both of course

The spices here can be absolutely anything that you have. Any general curry powder spice mix would be fine, or a mix of coriander, cumin and turmeric, or a tblsp of a curry paste from a jar.

If you have any, a sprinkle of fresh coriander would be lovely, or mint

Instead of the chickpeas, you could use any of the firm lentils, (the green/brown ones), soya beans (dried or green ones), a mix of root vegetables, a couple of chicken thighs, a couple of frozen white fish fillets. It would be a bit of a splodgy mix, but you could use the red lentils. And of course, any combination of these too.

You could substitute a tin of broken mandarin segments for the mango. You can use either coconut milk powder or a tin of coconut milk, or even some coconut cream.

Another one of those very variable recipes

I absolutely loved this, so much so, that I went back on to Approved Food to get some more coconut milk powder. I bought 20, yes you did read that right!, 20 boxes at 75p each, and some more mango. Both daughters will be getting some of this 🙂

I need to freeze the rest of the tin of mango. It says it’s pulp, but it’s completely smooth, tastes really nice just from a spoon. Would be lovely frozen just as it is to make mango sorbet, stirred through yogort, maybe freeze that too to make frozen mango yogort. You could pour it over fruit salad, or ice cream, whizz it into a milk shake, lots of things really.

As I was reading about recipes that use mango or coconut powder, I came across several things that said that as long as you have a source of Vitamin C, you can live on just coconuts. What I couldn’t find was what exactly that meant. Did they have to be the whole fresh ones with the fresh milk inside, which has lots of vitamins in, or can you use the powder, the tinned milk, or the cream. Link here, and here. I am intrigued by this as I have never heard it before. I am wondering if more coconut is a good idea on a diet that minimises expense. If you can live on it, then presumably it has most of what we need in terms of the nutritional balance. I know it is high in saturated fat, and I’ve never really known where to take a position re using the oil to cook with.

Does anyone know any more about this?

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Fritters, Soup, Gloves and Karen Millen
Glass ramekins and what to do with them
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